brownfield redevelopment

Congress does not often pass environmental legislation, so the passage of the Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act (BUILD Act) is noteworthy.  While the amount of federal funds available will still be far less than needed to move the needle, there are important changes to the law that will help facilitate brownfield redevelopment.  The most notable of these changes include:

  1. Protections for Local Governments-  Local governments will no longer trigger CERCLA liability as “owners or operators” by simply taking title to property through law enforcement activity, seizures, bankruptcy, tax delinquency, or other circumstances.  The big change is that the BUILD act removed the term “involuntary” as a qualifier for local government protection from CERCLA liability if it takes ownership of contaminated property.  This allows local government to be more proactive in taking ownership of brownfield to promote redevelopment without triggering CERCLA liability.
  2. Extends Bona Fide Purchaser Defense (BFPD) to Tenants- U.S. EPA has used enforcement discretion to extend BFPD to tenants.  The BUILD Act now formalizes that protection into the law.
  3. More Money- The Act more than doubles funding available up to $200 million each fiscal year through 2023 and additional $50 million per year for state response program funding;
  4. Expanded Eligibility-  Certain nonprofit organizations, limited liability corporations, limited partnerships and community development entities are now eligible to receive grant funding;
  5. Increases the Funding Limit-  Max grants were raised from $200,000 to $500,000;
  6. Eligibility of Administrative Costs- up to 5% of a grant can be used for administrative costs, not including investigation or identification of site, design and performance of response action, or monitoring of a natural response;
  7. Petroleum Contaminated Site-  Sites with petroleum contamination are eligible when there is no viable responsible property;
  8. Prioritizes “Clean Energy” and Waterfront Projects-  Projects that involve clean energy or are located on the waterfront will receive more points when scoring applications thereby prioritizing these projects.

While each of the improvements have benefits, the most significant are the expanded liability protections for local governments and tenants.  Allowing cities to proactively target and acquire property without fear of CERCLA liability is a major development that will help facilitate redevelopment.

A very interesting article appeared in Crain’s Cleveland Business by Jay Miller discussing “jobs sprawl” and the lack of easy access to jobs.

Brad Whitehead, president of the Fund, points to a study by the Center for Neighborhood Technologies, a Chicago nonprofit that focuses on making cities work better, that found that housing costs in Greater Clevelanders are low, but people here spend more of their money on housing plus transportation — 41% of their income — than people in Boston, 38%, or New York, 39%.

Similarly, a 2015 study by the Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C., think tank, found that between 2000 and 2012, the number of jobs near the average person in the Cleveland metropolitan area declined by 26.5%, the steepest decline among 96 metropolitan areas. The Akron metro ranked 84th. Part of that loss of job access is the result of an overall decline in jobs in the region, a 2.5% loss between 2002 and 2014, according to the U.S. Census, and part is the movement of jobs, of employers, from the central cities.

And finally, the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in a 2015 study found that low-skilled and low-paying jobs are the hardest to get to. It also found that, “Millennials and baby boomers alike want more accessible communities, whether that means a workplace within reach of transit or downsizing from large suburban homes to areas where amenities important to them are just a walk away.”

I found it amazing that the Clevelanders spend more money on housing plus transportation than major cities like Boston or New York.  As long as Ohio can’t leverage the lower cost of living in the state as a true strategic advantage, Ohio will never be able to compete with major cities like Boston, New York or Chicago.

The images below have appeared before on this blog, but they dramatically show the issues with urban sprawl as well as jobs sprawl.  The graphic on the left is developed land in Cuyahoga County in 1948 and the graphic on the right is developed land in 2002.  As development spreads out, the ability of the urban population to access jobs becomes more difficult.

The link between avoiding job sprawl and brownfields is unmistakable.  The more we discourage redevelopment of our inner core cities, the more we push jobs out into greenfields which fosters jobs sprawl.  Also, without an growing population and affordable transportation to jobs, large employers face increased challenges finding qualified candidates to fill job vacancies.  If the problem persists, employers look to relocate where they can ensure vacancies will be filled.

While Ohio used to be a leader in promoting brownfield redevelopment, a combination of factors over the last several years has pushed us to the back of the pack, even when compared to neighboring states like Michigan.  The combination of factors, all which have been discussed on this blog, include:

  • Clean Ohio, a national model in brownfield redevelopment incentive programs, sunset approximately 5-6 years ago leaving behind no definitive brownfield redevelopment program.  Between 10-20 major brownfield redevelopment projects were occurring per year over the decade Clean Ohio was in place
  • A lack of tax policy that promotes brownfield redevelopment.  The most significant tax benefit, the VAP 10-year tax abatement, is too cumbersome and too limited in scope.
  • JobsOhio, while the program has some major advantages and is currently has the best incentives for brownfields, the JobsOhio Revitalization Program has steep eligibility requirements and does not focus on specifically targeting brownfields for redevelopment
  • Local brownfield programs have dwindled- For example, Cuyahoga County has basically done away with its brownfield program and forgivable loans, a key incentive to promote brownfield redevelopment
  • VAP- Controversy surrounds the VAP program and whether it still provides the legal liability protection envisioned when the program was launched more than two decades ago
  • Vapor Intrusion-  Greater federal and state scrutiny on vapor intrusion issues has increased liability concerns for property owners and redevelopers looking to reuse brownfields

As we head into an Gubernatorial election year, more voices need to be raised discussing issues like jobs sprawl, brownfields and how to get Ohio’s population growing again.  While tax policy, education and economic development are critical to Ohio’s future, making sure we are putting new jobs in locations that can easily be accessed needs to be a key strategy in Ohio.

JobsOhio launched a new site selection tool called SiteOhio designed to provide easy access to businesses looking for locations to either develop new facilities or buy/lease existing buildings.  The easy to use web based tool allows you to search by the following parameters:

  • Available buildings of a certain size
  • Vacant land based on acreage
  • Businesses that may be for sale
  • Properties in specific communities by either city or county

The site selector tool allows you to compare filter properties by energy or broadband capability or labor force.  The tool is designed to allow businesses to more quickly identify sites that meet their needs.  

The site is also designed to certify sites as ready for development with available utilities, zoning, etc. The site hasn’t yet been fully populated with available sites, but JobsOhio will ensure that happens over time. Communities will be encouraged to go through the JobsOhio site authentication process to have sites in their communities certified as ready.

The JobsOhio authentication process is designed to identify sites that are "ready to develop on day one, saving businesses time and money."  JobsOhio in its announcement described the authentication process as follows:

“Through the SiteOhio authentication process, each site undergoes a usability audit designed to vet sites with companies in mind. All due diligence studies look to ensure strict criteria are met, as well as utilities and other site assets are on site, with excess capacity and accessible for doing business,” JobsOhio said in announcing the tool.

The site doesn’t include other information that may be key to determining suitability of a site, such as:

  • Taxes
  • Ease of permitting
  • Capacity of sewers
  • Availability of water

Implications for Brownfield Redevelopment

As JobsOhio stated in its announcement regarding the site selection tool, the purpose is to identify sites "ready to go on day one."  This certainly would not include brownfield properties.  A quick search of industrial properties by acreage shows a number of greenfield sites, typically industrial parks ready for development.  A quick search of available buildings identified mostly sites that would not qualify as traditional brownfield properties.  

While the tool is an excellent idea to expedite identification of readily available sites for development, the site selection tool will not encourage reuse of urban sites.  If the goal is of the site selector tool is to populate sites "ready to go on day one," then in order to encourage redevelopment of brownfield properties this would appear to encourage reconsideration of programs such as the Clean Ohio Redevelopment Ready Program.  Under this program, Clean Ohio funds were used to address environmental issues at brownfield sites upfront to facilitate reuse.

After more than ten years of building a brownfield redevelopment program, Cuyahoga County Officials are currently contemplating bringing the program to a close.  Over the last few years significant staff cuts have reduced the amount of resources dedicated to the program.  Now it appears that in 2017 the various incentives available to attract redevelopment to brownfields may no longer be available.  Or, there will be no staff dedicated to run the program.

Hopefully, County Officials will understand the critical need the brownfield programs provide to overcome the major impediments to reuse of old industrial and commercial buildings in the region.  Even with the recent economic development boom in Cleveland there remain hundreds of underutilized or vacant brownfield properties.

One of the most critical needs the County program fills is grant funds to pay for Phase I and limited Phase II environmental assessments through the County’s Brownfield Community Assessment Initiative. Under the program, the County would provide up to $5,000 in grant funds for Phase I assessments and up to $35,000 for Phase II assessments.  These incentives help overcome the first major hurdle to brownfield redevelopment- having no information about the condition of the property.  Many developers and businesses aren’t willing to front these assessment costs as part of early evaluation of a property.  

The County also provided forgivable loans to help offset environmental cleanup costs.  Under its Redevelopment Ready Program, the County can provide loan funds up to $1 million with 40% of the total loan forgivable if certain criteria are met.  This type of loan was a critical tool in the Miceli Dairy expansion project which was one of the significant brownfield redevelopment projects in Northeast Ohio.  Without County incentives, both assessment grants and a forgivable loan, the project never would have occurred.  The expansion kept and expanded jobs in a critical area in Cleveland.  

The County had offered a wide array of programs and incentives to help renovate vacant buildings and spur brownfield redevelopment.  It took nearly ten years to build up the expertise and incentives which made it a very successful program.  For a full list of the County Brownfield Programs click here.

We can only hope that the new Administration realizes what a critical function a brownfield program plays in an area with a long industrial past and limited space for redevelopment.

There is a lot of hyperbole regarding President-Elect Trump’s potential environmental agenda. During the campaign there was also a lot made about issues of employment and opportunity in the "Rust Belt" (a term I personally do no like).  Here are two suggestions of how the incoming Trump Administration could bring greater opportunity to the Rust Belt without controversial roll backs of environmental standards.   

  1. Bring Logic to Air Quality Standards and Regulations
  2. Moonshot on Brownfield Redevelopment

Bring Logic to Air Quality Standards and Regulations 

Midwestern states with large populations and a heavy manufacturing base are hit particularly hard by tightening air quality standards for ozone and small particulate matter (p.m. 2.5).  On October 1, 2015, EPA strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone to 70 parts per billion (ppb).  EPA will designate areas in late 2017 based on monitoring data as to whether they meet the ozone standard ("Attainment Areas") or do not meet the standard ("Non-Attainment Areas"). States will have until at least 2020 to achieve compliance with the revised standards. 

As the adjacent map demonstrates, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania (all key states to Trump’s victory) will have significant portions of the state designated as non-attainment areas.  The designations will result in more regulation and restrictions on economic growth.

The good news is that U.S. EPA projects that most areas will be able to reach attainment of the new standards as a result of already promulgated federal regulations for gasoline, autos, power plants, and other sources of emissions. U.S. EPA projects that these already promulgated regulations will bring all but 14 of the 241 counties that currently don’t meet the 70 ppb ozone standard into attainment.  However, the bad news is that these reductions will not be achieved until 2025, five years past the ozone deadline.  Furthermore, some Members of Congress are trying to block the federal regulations.

As discussed in a recent Congressional Research Service report on the new ozone standard, some while Members in Congress have objected to the federal standards for motor vehicles, fuels, power plants, and other sources.  However, the net effect of repealing them would be to shift the burden of attaining the ozone NAAQS more squarely in the direction of state and local governments. As detailed in prior posts (here and here), the states have very little ability to improve air quality through state specific regulations under required emission reduction plans (State Implementation Plans- SIPs) to meet the NAAQS.  The federal regulations are far more cost effective.

It’s not just new regulations that will hamper economic growth in non-attainment areas, it is also mandated restrictions on economic growth.  Under the Clear Air Act, businesses looking to expand or relocate must pay for more costly emission controls in non-attainment areas.  Also, in non-attainment areas any increase in air emissions associated with a business expansion must be offset by reductions from existing businesses before a permit can be issued that allows the expansion to go forward (i.e. "Offsets").  These requirements push businesses to avoid non-attainment areas reducing opportunities for economic expansion.  

A Trump Administration could bring more logic to this regulatory mish mash by resisting calls to roll back the more cost effective federal regulations and by adjusting attainment deadlines to give states more time to take full advantage of federal regulations already on the books. Such actions would also avoid promulgation of costly new local air regulations that will largely do very little to improve air quality.  

Moonshot on Brownfield Redevelopment

A major focus during the campaign was how to improve our urban centers- finding ways to attract development and jobs to our neglected cities.  A highly effective means of giving a boost to our inner cities would be to energize U.S. EPA’s brownfield program as well as other brownfield incentives. 

As detailed in a four part series on this blog, brownfields lead to significant decay, social injustice and loss of opportunity (i.e. jobs).  The cost for businesses to expand in our urban centers is often complicated by the cost to cleanup pre-existing contamination.  Those costs are avoided by moving out of the City and developing on greenfields instead.

While brownfield programs have been successful, they have been wholly inadequate to make a significant difference.  If part of the Trump Administration’s massive infrastructure program was directed toward brownfield redevelopment, this could be a major shot in the arm promoting capital investment, cleaning up sites that pose public health issues and creating more jobs for those living in the inner city.  

Companies expanding onto brownfield sites need public incentives to make their projects viable.  However, the days when cleanup of contamination by itself could attract public incentives are long over.  Under the new local and State brownfield programs companies must make job commitments and/or improvements to the property to attract government assistance.

When companies work with State and local officials to obtain brownfield incentives they must engage in negotiations regarding what they are willing to commit to as part of the project.  These commitments will often extend 3 or more years out into the future when it becomes more challenging to predict economic and business conditions.

The Dayton Daily News discussed the State of Ohio’s pursuit to recover incentives from companies that failed to meet business expansion or development commitments.  The DDN reported:

State officials reviewed 329 economic development deals that concluded in 2015 and found that all but 50 had substantially complied with the terms, such as hitting job creation and retention numbers, training workers and generating new payroll.

If companies fail to live up to their promises, the state may demand repayment or make other changes to the deal. In the 50 cases where targets weren’t hit, the state is moving to clawback a collective $776,000. Some of the biggest take backs are being launched against well-known, big companies — Proctor & Gamble Co., U.S. Steel Corp., and The Dannon Co. — for failing to create or retain promised jobs

This is very relevant to JobsOhio brownfield grants and loans provided to companies to assist with sampling or cleanup at contaminated properties.  The grant agreements for the JobsOhio Revitalization Program include contractual commitments to increase payroll, add jobs or make capital investments to expand the business.  For example, at minimum, JobsOhio typically requires 20 new jobs over a three year period to compete for brownfield cleanup grant funding under its Revitalization Program.

The grant agreement language is somewhat vague as to what happens if the grant commitments are not met by the company.  The language does allow for companies to assert that changing economic conditions resulted in unmet commitments.  However, the contract language does leave open the possibility JobsOhio could request return of the entire brownfield grant provided.

It is important that companies pursuing brownfield incentives be aware of the consequences of not meeting commitments.  It is also important to avoid putting forward unrealistic job or capital investment commitments just to attract upfront grant money.  Companies that over commit open themselves up to clawback by the State of the funds provided as well as publicly being outed for failing to live up to their commitments.

Ohio is not the only state that is reviewing all sites that have trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) recently announced that is was going to review 1,000 closed sites with TCE contamination.  MassDEP will evaluate the sites "based on the current understanding of health risks, even if the site was previously closed properly under earlier standards."  

Unlike Ohio, MassDEP issued a public statement in April 2016 that it discussing its review of TCE Sites. Ohio EPA has not made a public announcement similar to Mass DEP.  Rather, Ohio EPA has discussed its review in meetings with environmental consultants and through issuance of letters and requests for information to sites with TCE contamination.

TCE was widely used as a degreaser for industrial metal parts and as an extraction solvent for organic oils. As a result of its use, TCE contamination related to use of solvents is very common at manufacturing sites.  

A discussed in the MassDEP announcement, the heightened scrutiny of sites with TCE contamination was based, in part, on a 2011 review to the U.S. EPA toxicity information.  The review included assessment of the potential for fetal developmental effects following even short-term exposure to TCE contamination.  As a result, the standards related to TCE have become significantly more stringent.

MassDEP provided a comparison of the levels of concern from 2011 to 2016 which shows the TCE standards:

Changes in TCE Risk-Based Levels in Massachusetts
Pathway 2011 Level of Concern 2016 Level of Concern
Indoor Air (Residential) 85 ug/m3 6 ug/m3
Groundwater (near residences)

300 ug/l pre-2006

50 ug/l post-2006

5 ug/l
Health Effect of Concern Long-term cancer risk Short-term development effect

 The primary pathway of concern in both Massachusetts and Ohio is vapor intrusion (volatilization of contaminants into the indoor air of a building).  Ohio’s current indoor air standards are relatively comparable to MassDEP.

Ohio TCE Indoor Air Standards
Pathway Standard
Residential 2.1 ug/m3
Commercial Industrial 8.8 ug/m3

Continued developments with regard to TCE are surely forthcoming.  As the new significantly more stringent standards get implemented property owners and site developers that have TCE contamination will need to proceed cautiously.  This includes sites that previously completed investigations or cleanup activities.

In my four part blog post series- Rethinking Brownfield Redevelopment in Ohio- the final post advocated for a new Ohio liability protection law for buyers of contaminated property.  The new law would provide brownfield redevelopers liability protection faster and at a lower cost than the current Ohio Voluntary Action Program (VAP).

I suggested looking to Michigan’s Baseline Environmental Assessment (BEA) law for guidance on how to set up such a program.  Well Kansas has recently passed a new law that provides a second example.  

On May 9, 2016, the Contaminated Property Redevelopment Act (S.B. 227) was signed into law by Kansas Governor Sam Brownback.  Similar to the Michigan BEA, the new law provides buyers of contaminated property liability protection under certain conditions. Those conditions include:

  • The Buyer cannot have caused or contributed to the pre-existing contamination on the property;
  • The Buyer cannot exacerbate pre-existing contamination on the property either through redevelopment or other activities;
  • Buyer must request liability protection from the Kansas Department of Health ("Kansas DHE") and Environment by applying for a Certificate of Environmental Liability Release ("CELR");
  • The Application for a CELR must include a Phase I or Phase I/Phase II assessment report or other reports requested by Kansas DHE that demonstrate the property was adequately assessed; and
  • The Buyer must provide notice to future purchasers of the existence of the CELR and notify Kansas DHE upon transfer of the property.

What is interesting is that the new law does not affirmatively require the Kansas DHE to make a finding that buyer has taken appropriate steps to address immediate environmental threats or public health risks similar to the "reasonable steps" requirement under U.S. EPA’s Bona Fide Purchaser Defense.

A fee is charged by the Kansas DHE to review CELR applications.  Those fees are placed into the Contaminated Property Redevelopment Fund to assist municipalities with brownfield redevelopment.

Kansas provides another example of an enhanced Bona Fide Purchaser Defense at the State level that will likely accelerate brownfield redevelopment. 
 

This is the third post in a series of four assessing the current state of brownfield redevelopment in the State of Ohio.  This third post will evaluate the progress Ohio has made in the last twenty years with regard to addressing brownfields.

Current Options for Addressing Environmental Liability 

As discussed extensively in the prior posts in this series, environmental liability concerns are a major disincentive for brownfield redevelopment versus greenfield development.  Many different federal and state environmental statutes can impose liability on owners of property: RCRA (hazardous waste and petroleum contamination); TSCA (PCBs), Clean Water Act (runoff, sediment, wetlands), and other federal or state statutes.

However, the law that imposes the most far reaching liability for environmental contamination is CERCLA (Superfund) which imposes joint and several liability on buyers of contaminated property. Under CERCLA, a new owner of property can have liability for preexisting contamination regardless of whether they performed activities that created the contamination.  

CERCLA’s broad liability provisions act as a major deterrent to brownfield redevelopment. Ohio utilizes two principal mechanisms to address the risk associated with CERCLA legal liability:

  1. Voluntary Action Program (VAP)-  Adopted in 1996 to provide greater flexibility in cleaning up brownfield properties.  The VAP has been very successful.  No question the program provided greater and more cost effective cleanup options for brownfield properties. As detailed below, the VAP has been utilized to cleanup hundreds of brownfield properties. VAP cleanup standards are regularly referenced during due diligence as a means of evaluating environmental liability.  In fact, some developers or owners perform limited cleanups using VAP standards without seeking Ohio EPA’s concurrence the cleanup was sufficient.   
  2. Bona Fide Purchaser Defense (BFPD) (i.e. "All Appropriate Inquiries" under CERCLA)-   In 2002, Congress created the Bona Fide Purchaser Defense to encourage brownfield redevelopment.  EPA adopted the "All Appropriate Inquiry" rule which established a mandatory level of environmental due diligence a buyer must perform to qualify for the liability defense.  If due diligence identifies ongoing releases or risks to human health, the buyer must take "reasonable" steps to address those issues.  However, a buyer does not need to perform a full cleanup of the property to qualify for the defense.

Issues with VAP 

Twenty years ago the VAP was considered groundbreaking.  The program allowed privatized cleanups where the company/developer’s consultant completed the cleanup and submitted a No Further Action (NFA) after the cleanup was completed.  Ohio EPA reviews the NFA and, if the property meets VAP standards, the Agency will issue a legal release (i.e. Covenant-Not-to-Sue or CNS).

While the VAP provides a lower cost alternative to perform a full investigation and cleanup, the program has been underutilized.  Here are some of the reasons why:

  • Slow Process– Many real estate deals need to be completed in a few months or even shorter.  It can take 90 to 180 days just to complete the VAP investigation of the property (i.e. Phase II assessment).  A full cleanup can take one, two, three or even more years to complete.
  • Costs-  Twenty years ago the program was championed as a lower cost alternative to traditional CERCLA cleanups.  However, the cost to take property through the VAP can still be very high.  It can cost $100,000 to $200,000 for a VAP Phase II alone.  Full cleanup can cost hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars.  These costs act as a strong deterrent to entering the VAP program.
  • Complexity-  The VAP program is highly complex.  There are around ninety guidance documents alone in addition to nearly one hundred pages of rules.  

Issues with BFPD

The Bona Fide Purchaser Defense (BFPD) has been in place for a little over a decade.  The advantages of the BFPD is that is much faster and cheaper than the VAP.  In many transactions, the Phase I assessment by itself is enough to establish the BFPD if no problems are identified (i.e. a "Clean" Phase I). Even if Phase II sampling is needed, sampling can be completed in 30-60 days at a much lower cost than a full VAP Phase II.  However, the BFPD has its own set of issues: 

  • No Sign Off by Regulators-  Some like that sampling and cleanup plans do not need to be reviewed by regulators to qualify for the defense.  However, without review there is no assurance to the buyer that they qualify for the defense.  In fact, a property owner cannot even voluntarily submit sampling and cleanup plans for concurrence.  As a result, property owners only find out if the sampling or cleanup was sufficient if it stands up in court.
  • No Public Disclosure-  Mandatory disclosure laws act as a strong deterrent to completing transactions involving contaminated properties.  However, providing incentives to voluntarily disclose the results of due diligence can create more public information regarding the condition of properties. 

Current Ohio Brownfield Incentives

Paying for sampling and cleanup of brownfield properties is expensive.  As discussed in prior posts, these costs push companies to consider greenfields over brownfields.  To offset these costs and attract companies and developer to brownfield properties, Ohio has a variety of incentives available. Those programs include:

Brownfield Grants and Loans Tax Incentives

Former Clean Ohio Program

  • No Longer Active
  • Up to $300,000 Phase II grant
  • Up to $3 million cleanup grants
Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit

JobsOhio Revitalization Program

  • Up to $200,000 Phase II grant
  • Up to $1 million 
New Market Tax Credit
County and Municipal Grant & Loan Programs VAP Automatic Tax Credit (R.C. 5709.87)

 Issues with Grant/Loans/Tax Incentives

  • JobsOhio Revitalization Program targets a limited number of projects.  Certain brownfield redevelopment projects cannot even qualify for funding, such as retail or residential.  This narrows the range of possible projects on brownfield sites that can offset investigation and cleanup costs
  • Insufficient Funding-  Cleanup grant funding at both the state and local level is capped at around $1 million.  While this amount of grant funding may be adequate for a number of projects, more contaminated properties will not attract sufficient funding to offset cleanup costs.
  • VAP Automatic Tax Abatement-  While this is the primary brownfield tax incentive, issues with its scope and implementation are well documented in prior blog posts.  One of the biggest issues is that it doesn’t cover new structures.  It also assumes property valuations already account for contamination.

Ohio’s Scorecard on Brownfield Redevelopment

Let’s review the number of VAP projects completed and incentives utilized to leverage brownfield redevelopment.

VAP Cleanups Completed 1995-2015

659 NFA’s submitted to Ohio EPA 

132 withdrawn, denied, revoked or pending

527 VAP Covenants-Not-to-Sue have been issued

 

Clean Ohio (2001-2012)

Clean Ohio was the primary brownfield grant program in Ohio for over a decade.  More data is available to evaluate the success of the program.  According to Greater Ohio, approximately 160 Clean Ohio Revitalization Projects were completed.  In reviewing VAP projects completed by year, clearly Clean Ohio accelerated brownfield redevelopment in Ohio.

1995-2001 (Pre-Clean Ohio) approximately 17 VAP covenants were issued per year

2001-2015 (During Clean Ohio) approximately 35 VAP covenants were issues per year

Based upon a study performed by Greater Ohio, an average grant incentive per Clean Ohio project was $1.97 million.  It is worth noting that this study showed each Clean Ohio dollar spent generated $4.67 in new economic activity.

Scorecard on Brownfield Redevelopment in Ohio
Total Sites to Address under the VAP Years to Address under VAP Total Cost in Incentives
527 covenants in 20 years since VAP implemented Assuming full restoration of Clean Ohio funding Assuming Clean Ohio available
estimated 10,000 brownfield sites* 35 VAP projects per year $1.97 million on average per project
9,437 brownfield sites left to be addressed 270 Years to address all brownfields under the VAP $18.5 billion in incentives to address all brownfields under the VAP

There are a number of assumptions built in to the scorecard that anyone could challenge. Including:

  • There is no reliable inventory of brownfield sites in Ohio.  The number 10,000 was taken from a U.S. EPA estimate discussed in a prior post.
  • Not all brownfield sites are addressed by the VAP.  However, when it was adopted most thought the vast majority of brownfield cleanups would go through the program.
  • Clean Ohio no longer exists and a brownfield program of that size and scope is not currently contemplated.

While the assumptions underlying the scorecard are fair game, it still demonstrates how long and how much it would cost to address a significant number of brownfield properties under the VAP. The scorecard also suggests there may be better strategies available to accelerate brownfield redevelopment in Ohio.  

The final post in the series will include a discussion of new strategies to try an accelerate brownfield redevelopment in Ohio.

This second post in the series discussing brownfield redevelopment in Ohio will provide an overview of the extent and nature of Ohio’s brownfield problem.  First, the post will discuss Ohio’s progress in spurring brownfield versus greenfield redevelopment.  Second, the post will provide an overview of public information regarding the number of brownfields in Ohio  

Urban Sprawl in Ohio

One issue discussed in Part 1 of this series was how failure to re-utilize urban core properties significantly contributes to the issue of urban sprawl.  The negatives of urban sprawl are well documented:  decay of inner urban areas, increase infrastructure costs, more traffic (and associated air pollution) and greater impact to wetlands and streams as development moves to greenfields.

How is Ohio doing with regard to urban sprawl?  Not well based upon an analysis performed in 2014 by Smart Growth America.  Here are the rankings of some of Ohio’s largest cities:

  • Cleveland 153
  • Cleveland 138
  • Toledo 117
  • Dayton 116
  • Canton 93
  • Akron 111
  • Cincinnati 166

Cincinnati Urban Sprawl Trends

A study performed by Smart Growth America of the Cincinnati region showed that during the time period of 1196-2005 the trends on brownfield versus greenfield redevelopment were as follows:

  • Thirty (30) businesses that expanded operations moved from transit accessible areas to areas without transit (i.e. out of the urban core);
  • Eight (8) business expanded within the urban core

This is a clear demonstration of the trends that the costs to redevelop brownfields pushes many businesses to expand or relocate to the suburbs contributing to Ohio’s urban sprawl issues.

Cleveland Urban Sprawl Trends

Some times a picture (or in this case a graphic) is worth a thousand words.  Here is a graphic that shows developed land in Cuyahoga County from 1948 to 2002:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is worth noting that there may be a major shift in these trends due to the millennials preference for downtown living.  A recent study showed that 7 city centers outperformed their surrounding metros in the 2002-07 period, 21 outperformed the periphery in 2007-2011.  Certainly, that trend is evident right here in Cleveland where residential occupancy is above 97.8% with major new downtown residential developments planned.  

The major shift in living preferences creates a golden opportunity to accelerate brownfield redevelopment.  

How many Brownfields are in Ohio?

Ohio does not maintain a registry that provides a good inventory of all brownfield sites.  The most extensive registry maintained by Ohio EPA was referred to as the "Master’s Site List."  However, after a property owner challenged its listing on the MSL, it was determined Ohio EPA did not have the legal authority to maintain the list.  Ohio EPA stopped maintaining the list in 1999.

Currently, Ohio EPA maintains the Ohio Brownfield Inventory, but listing of properties is voluntary. Typically, properties are listed in order to qualify for some brownfield redevelopment incentives. Therefore, the registry does not provide a good estimate of the actual number of brownfields.

Public information is limited on brownfields.  A review of local studies and information from local officials and U.S. EPA reveal the following statistics which provide some insight into the extent of the brownfield problem in Ohio:  

  • 119 brownfields in Lucas County (1996 estimate);
  • An estimated 62% of real estate transactions in Lucas County are encumbered by environmental issues;
  • An estimated 25% of transactions in Toledo were abandoned due to environmental issues with an average job lost of 20 jobs per lost transaction;
  • An estimated 4,623 acres of brownfields are in Cuyahoga County;
  • 350 brownfields in Cleveland with an estimated 1,000 to 2,000 condemned structures
  • 40,000 acres or 14% of Cuyahoga County’s land was industrial at some point (Estimate by the Cuyahoga Planning Commission)

Statewide estimates on brownfields:

  • 417 Ohio sites are currently identified on CERCLIS (sites on or being evaluated for Superfund Listing)
  • Over 5,000 RCRA sites listed on US EPA RCRAInfo data base
  • 4,000 to 6,000 brownfield sites in Ohio (as estimated by the Government Accounting Office)
  • U.S. EPA has a higher estimate- Over 10,000 brownfield sites have been inventoried by local governments according to testimony from Joe Dufficy (U.S. EPA) before Congress in 2005

Importance of Better Information on Brownfields

A strong case can be made that Ohio needs tools to create a better inventory of brownfields.  It’s current system of waiting for volunteers looking for incentives to list sites results in very limited information.  

A better inventory helps to inform public policy as well as better track progress in addressing brownfields.  Also, better information provides more public information regarding sites that have issues.

Some may argue that there should be a mandatory law requiring all brownfield sites to be listed. However, there are many issues with this concept.  Such mandatory laws discourage brownfield redevelopment or even gathering data regarding contamination on property.  This is the exact opposite of what Ohio needs to do if it wants to encourage more brownfield redevelopment.

A mandatory law exists in New Jersey and my colleagues familiar with the New Jersey market state it acts as a strong deterrent to gathering data regarding contamination as well as transactions.

A better system is one that offers strong incentives to voluntarily disclose information regarding conditions of property.  The final post in this series will discuss Michigan’s Baseline Environmental Assessment program which has been highly successful in gathering public information regarding the condition of contaminated property in the state while at the same time spurring brownfield redevelopment.