Brownfields/Transactions

The Greater Ohio Policy Center (GOPC) has been calling attention to Ohio’s so-called “legacy cities.”  These are the smaller to mid-sized cities across the state other than Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Akron, Canton and Youngstown.  Cities like Portsmouth, Mansfield, and Lorain.

A recent Dispatch editorial called attention to GOPC’s efforts regarding Ohio’s legacy cities citing

Many businesses or developers are intimidated about purchasing property former industrial or commercial property that may be contaminated.  The fear of the unknown can be the biggest deterrent to considering properties that may be contaminated.  Common concerns include:

  • Could I be buying a potential mess, which could cost me six to seven figures to

Since the sunset of the very successful Clean Ohio Brownfield Revitalization Program, brownfield redevelopment has slowed in Ohio.  At a time when the economy is finally doing well, and real estate development is in full recovery mode, brownfields are still being passed over for less costly redevelopment options.

This past week, Representative Arndt introduced House

Congress does not often pass environmental legislation, so the passage of the Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act (BUILD Act) is noteworthy.  While the amount of federal funds available will still be far less than needed to move the needle, there are important changes to the law that will help facilitate brownfield

[SPECIAL BLOG POST: Ohio EPA asked to publish a guest post on the Ohio Environmental Law Blog regarding recent developments pertaining to the Agency’s response to sites with trichloroethene (TCE) and the Voluntary Action Program (VAP).  The Ohio EPA response is posted below in its entirety]

In August 2017, Ohio EPA announced to Certified

As discussed in my prior post, in September Ohio EPA announced that it would be sending “hundreds of letters” to property owners that have trichloroethylene  (TCE) contamination, including property owners that cleaned up their property under the Voluntary Action Program (VAP).  At the September meeting of VAP professionals the Agency announced that it could take