EPA Announces Tighter Ozone Standard; Big Implications for Ohio

Today, U.S. EPA announced it has officially thrown out the .075 ppm ozone standard proposed in 2008 by the Bush Administration.  The Bush proposal would have reduced the standard from .08 ppm to .075 ppm.  Now the EPA is proposing to set a new revised ozone standard somewhere between .06 ppm to .07 ppm.  This from the Washington Post regarding the proposed new ozone standard:

Ozone standards have been the center of a political and legal battle since the spring of 2008, when the EPA set a looser limit than what its own scientific advisers had suggested and President Bush himself intervened to scale back the agency's proposal at the last minute. The new proposal mirrors what EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee unanimously recommended in 2007.

What are the implications for Ohio?  To say they are significant would be a gross understatement.  The following chart from Ohio EPA demonstrates that significant progress has been made in reducing ozone levels in the State.

 However, it becomes more and more difficult to achieve standards as they become more stringent.  Many businesses have already been squeezed hard to reduce their emissions.  The cost to achieve additional reductions will be greater. 

Ohio has been able to redesignate much of the state into attainment with the old .08 ppm standard.  Even Cleveland, the highest ozone levels in the State, was able to achieve the standard barely in time and was redesignated. 

As discussed above, the Bush Administration had previously proposed lowering that standard to .075 ppm. Based upon recent ozone data for major cities, this standard was going to be difficult to achieve.  The chart below show Cleveland monitors just came barely below the .084 ppm standard required to demonstrate compliance.  (EPA allow up to .084 ppm to meet the old standard.  Also note, the chart is in parts per billion).  Cincinnati and Columbus also barely achieved the old standard.

Achieving the .075 ppm standard would be very difficult based upon this data.  However, now comes the news today that EPA has elected to throw out the .075 ppm standard established by the Bush Administration as inconsistent with the scientific recommendations provided to EPA.   This from EPA's press release:

In September 2009 Administrator Jackson announced that EPA would reconsider the existing ozone standards, set at 0.075 ppm in March 2008. As part of its reconsideration, EPA conducted a review of the science that guided the 2008 decision, including more than 1,700 scientific studies and public comments from the 2008 rulemaking process. EPA also reviewed the findings of the independent Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, which recommended standards in the ranges proposed today.

Today's announcement indicates the standard will be set some where between .06 to .07 ppm.  What are the implications of the high end of that spectrum, .07 ppm standard, on Ohio? 

  • Under the .075 ppm standard 23 out of Ohio EPA's 49 air monitors show non-attainment
  • Under the .07 ppm standard 49 out of 49 monitors show non-attainment

Designations could happen this fall, which means virtually every county that touches any major metropolitan area (Toledo, Columbus, Cleveland, Akron, Canton and Youngstown) will be designated non-attainment.  EPA estimates 32 Ohio counties would be out of compliance with the .07 ppm standard.  Non-attainment designations brings with it restrictions on new or expanding businesses.  It also brings with it more stringent air pollution control requirements. 

 

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